What are the Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes?

Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of connective tissue disorders that can be inherited and are varied both in how affect the body and in their genetic causes. They are generally characterized by joint hypermobility (joints that stretch further than normal), skin hyperextensibility (skin that can be stretched further than normal), and tissue fragility.

The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are currently classified into thirteen subtypes. There is oftem symptom overlap between the EDS subtypes and the other connective tissue disorders including hypermobility spectrum disorders.

What are the symptoms of the Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes?

Joints

Joint hypermobility; loose/unstable joints which are prone to frequent dislocations and/or subluxations; joint pain; hyperextensible joints (they move beyond the joint’s normal range); early onset of osteoarthritis.

Skin

Soft velvety-like skin; variable skin hyper-extensibility; fragile skin that tears or bruises easily (bruising may be severe); severe scarring; slow and poor wound healing; development of molluscoid pseudo tumors (fleshy lesions associated with scars over pressure areas).

Miscellaneous/Less Common

Chronic, early onset, debilitating musculoskeletal pain (usually associated with the Hypermobility Type); arterial/intestinal/uterine fragility or rupture (usually associated with the Vascular Type); scoliosis at birth and scleral fragility (associated with the Kyphoscoliosis Type); poor muscle tone (associated with the Arthrochalasia Type); mitral valve prolapse; and gum disease.

It is important to remember that each patient's symptoms and experience with the EDS is unique.

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© 2019 Atlantic Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Society

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Background Image copyright Danielle Robitaille 2016

Nova Scotia|Canada

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